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EastRidge Academy
SealedEnvelope
EastRidge Academy Seal

Motto

I like Chicken.

Established

I don't know the date system

Type

Private

Headmistress

Veraniel Sansdarth

Faculty

>10

Students

>30

Location

Central Easden

Campus

>1 acre

EastRidge Academy is a prestigious secondary school focused on preparing students for martial vocations such as military service, mercenary work, and, of course, adventuring.

HistoryEdit

blah blah blah

Faculty and StaffEdit

Main article: Faculty and Staff.

Course CatalogueEdit

See Course Catalogue.

FacilityEdit

FortificationsEdit

The Academy is enclosed by a large wall that rivals that of any fortress. Its primary entrance is the main gate which is flanked by two watchtowers.

BuildingsEdit

Drop TowerEdit

Drop Tower consists of four wings connected to a common library. Each of the four wings is a dormitory for one of the Academy's majors.

  • North Wing
  • East Wing - Mages
  • South Wing
  • West Wing

InfirmaryEdit

The infirmary is located on the western side of the Academy and is where Cleric majors practice their art on wounded students.

GroundsEdit

Sparring GroundsEdit

Field where sparring classes are held. There are a number of sparring rings with different characteristics.

StablesEdit

Where horses are kept?

GardensEdit

With... plants?

Academic PoliciesEdit

Eastridge Academy is well known for its tradition of academic excellence. Curriculum is designed to provide students with a comprehensive education, balancing knowledge of tactics, strategy, and theory with hands-on field experience. Students primarily focus on one of the four main fields of study of Warrior, Mage, Thief, or Cleric.


RequirementsEdit

In order to support a well-rounded education, each student is required to focus on two areas of study, with the majority of classes focusing around one department and with a minority of classes (see “Majors and Minors”) around a different department. Only in rare exceptions and under the consent of the headmaster will students be allowed to pursue one area of study.

Transfer students or students with an extraordinary background of the subject may be exempt from having to complete certain classes, and may advance or pursue independent study upon proof of content knowledge and consent of instructor.

Majors and MinorsEdit

Each department has its own rigorous program of requirements for fulfillment of the major. These requirements usually include: (1) completion of a set of core courses, (2) completion of a certain number of electives, (3) practical field experience within each core course, and (4) completion of an In-Action Assignment (see “In-Action Assignment). Students pursuing minors for each elective need only complete the core courses and the fieldwork for credit, yet may, if time and capacity allows, choose to take major electives.

UnderclassmenEdit

First-year courses are aimed at providing an introduction to the field of study and are composed of core classes for the major and minor. Second year courses expand on the foundational knowledge of first-year courses. During the second year, students are introduced to the Simulated Battle (see eponymous section) model. Sometime during the second half of the school term, second-year students are required to participate in an in-action assignment, during which their performance will be evaluated for final marks.

Third-year courses are still composed of major and minor core classes, yet concentrate more on field training. During the third year, students are introduced to the Improvisational Battle model, an expansion of the Simulated Battle. At the end of the third-year, students are required to plan an in-action assignment. All third-years are qualified for leadership positions and roles during their in-action assignment and might find themselves leading younger students into battle. First, second, and third year students are also required to finish the general education electives (see “General Education Electives”).

UpperclassmenEdit

Fourth year courses allow students to finish their core classes and choose from a variety of electives. During this year, students may dedicate time to developing a specialty within their field. Students who are struggling this year may be required to or may opt to re-take core classes. At the end of the fourth year, students are required to plan an in-action assignment and will be placed in charge of various units.

Fifth year students still take electives, but must also create and develop working projects within their field of study that contribute to that study’s field of knowledge and experience. At the end of the fourth year, students are required to plan an in-action assignment and will be placed in charge of or in key roles of various units. At this point in the students’ academic career, Evaluations will be conducted, deeming students fit to participate in sixth and seventh level activities.

Courses for students in their final years introduce more real-world battles to the students’ range of knowledge, with instruction highly variable and dependent on the individual. Graduating students fall under the guidance of masters of the field and act as apprentices for the year. Such students can take commissions from local governments and private hiring persons, depending.

General Education ElectivesEdit

First, second, and third-year students are required to take general education electives. These classes provide useful instruction and give students breadth. General education electives are courses of study outside yet pertinent to all majors and minors.

Students usually share the same general education requirements. Examples of general education electives are: Decorum and Etiquette, World History, and Basic Strategies and Tactics.


AssignmentsEdit

The In-Action AssignmentEdit

First, second, and third-year students are required to take general education electives. These classes provide useful instruction and give students breadth. General education electives are courses of study outside yet pertinent to all majors and minors.

Students usually share the same general education requirements. Examples of general education electives are: Decorum and Etiquette, World History, and Basic Strategies and Tactics.

Simulated and Improvisational BattleEdit

Simulated and Improvisational Battles occur on the training grounds to the northeast. Simulated battles are inter-level, battle melees which require students to rely on both individual and unit strategies and training. Usually, students participate in competing teams. Defeat of a team occurs when the other team secures a sound strategic defense or offense, or when a certain set of challenges is met.

Improvisational Battle, or Improv Battle, is similar to simulated battle, except that landscape and resources can change multiple times during battle. Improv battles incorporate the use of moving training ground, and allow students to become more versatile and flexible in their training. Improv Battle varies by major and minor course.


GraduationEdit

Students must undergo written, oral, and practical examinations as well as a portfolio of past missions for graduation from the program.

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